Resolving a Struggle with Google

For months, I have been searching for a way to ensure my students have been doing thier homework without having to take in copious amounts of paper.  Google Forms has come to my rescue!

Photo by Liz Halina CC-BY-NC-ND

Photo by Liz Halina CC-BY-NC-ND

Not only can I send all of my students the concept questions via Google Form, their answers are convieniently placed on a Google Sheet with a date/time stamp for me to see when they completed the assignment.

Three key pieces of information were quickly determined: some students did NOT do thier work (nothing but blank where their response should have been); some students were completing their work after midnight (clearly a problem with getting adequate rest and balance); and misconceptions were easilty identified.

The more I use Google Apps for Educators, the more practical applications I can see for my students, my department, and myself for constructing meaning and communication.  Next week during our professional development afternoon, I will give my department a demonstration of a site that I constructed and how I am using it in class.  #excited

Searching for Something

I thought I knew how to search Google for something. Meaning searching and locating information.  Meaning finding meaningful information.  Meaning doing it efficiently.  Meaning searching effectively.

After reading Jeff Utecht’s article “Why K-12 schools are failing by not teaching SEARCH“, and watching several of the videos from Google’s “Power Searching“, I started asking questions.  Am I a good searcher?  Do I ask good questions?  How do I go about researching information?  If I am not searching efficiently or effectively, how are my students searching?  Am I failing my students by not teaching them search?  How do my students go about searching?

I can be doing better.  I managed to get through the Coetail program without really thinking about how I search.  How was that possible?  Perhaps I am so used to doing things in one way and  got really good at doing it that way.  But to learn and grow, we need to add new information and ways of doing to the old information and ways of doing.

One of my goals for my Physics class is to do a research project.  I now know I should spend time with them learning how to search effectively and efficiently to scaffold them in beginning their project.

What now?  Learn to search more effectively and efficiently and share those skills with my students.  Share tips and tricks and knowledge so we can all find what we are looking for.

GAFE Class, Day 2

In the past hour, I have learned more about Google Chrome than I have in the past… well, forever.  Thanks to one simple, little 12 minute video.

So far, the GAFE class has opened my mind to a new way to manage my online browsing and use of apps, and it’s only been two days.  Where the Coetail program left off, the GAFE class is taking over.  I can’t wait for my week of professional development next week to “play” with all these new (to me) ideas.

I am excited to learn and share, to hopefully help my students broaden their learning to the online, global world.

Now if only the Olympics weren’t on, I could maybe get some work done! (Go Team Canada!)

Action Research: Video Analysis in High School

This past year has seen a lot of work done by me and my partners, Luke LaBaw and Bebe Ullrich, two amazing PE teachers at the American Embassy School in New Delhi, India.

We began wondering how effective video analysis would be on skill improvement.  Over several months, we designed and planned our research.  This past January, we implemented the design on six high school badminton classes.  We then analyzed the results.

We were astounded at how well video analysis worked at helping students learn and improve badminton skills.

Have a read of our research paper.

Bebe Ullrich helping a student use video analysis.  Photo by Liz Halina CC-BY-ND-NC

Bebe Ullrich helping a student use video analysis. Photo by Liz Halina CC-BY-ND-NC

 

Please contact me if you are interested in repeating the experiment or using video analysis in your classroom.

New Coetail Blog Post

The end has come for the five Coetail courses I took at the American Embassy School in New Delhi, India.  A huge thanks goes to Bebe Ullrich and Luke LaBaw for sharing this journey of growth with me for our final project, which also served as our Master’s research project.  Another huge thank you goes to Dana Watts and Gary Coyle, the instructors for the Coetail program at AES.

Enjoy the final post for this two year journey!